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Estate Planning

We have prepared a series of videos to provide hints, tips and guidance on the following subjects:

  1. Lasting Powers of Attorney
  2. Probate
  3. Disability Trusts - Why trusts for disabled children are important

To select a title from a Series of videos, click the Playlist drop down menu in the top left hand corner of the You Tube screen.

We have prepared a series of videos to provide hints, tips and guidance on the following subjects:

  1. Lasting Powers of Attorney
  2. Probate
  3. Disability Trusts - Why trusts for disabled children are important

To select a title from a Series of videos, click the Playlist drop down menu in the top left hand corner of the You Tube screen.

We have prepared a series of videos to provide hints, tips and guidance on the following subjects:

  1. Lasting Powers of Attorney
  2. Probate
  3. Disability Trusts - Why trusts for disabled children are important

To select a title from a Series of videos, click the Playlist drop down menu in the top left hand corner of the You Tube screen.

We have prepared a series of videos to explain Personal Injury Trusts, through this series we will be answering the questions:

  1. What exactly is a Personal Injury Trust and why have one?
  2. Why are there so many names for Trusts?
  3. What sort of Trust should I use?
  4. What are Trustees and what do they do?
  5. What if I don't want a Trust?

Throughout this week another video will be added each day.

We have prepared a series of videos to explain Personal Injury Trusts, through this series we will be answering the questions:

  1. What exactly is a Personal Injury Trust and why have one?
  2. Why are there so many names for Trusts?
  3. What sort of Trust should I use?
  4. What are Trustees and what do they do?
  5. What if I don't want a Trust?

Throughout this week another video will be added each day.

We have prepared a series of videos to explain Personal Injury Trusts, through this series we will be answering the questions:

  1. What exactly is a Personal Injury Trust and why have one?
  2. Why are there so many names for Trusts?
  3. What sort of Trust should I use?
  4. What are Trustees and what do they do?
  5. What if I don't want a Trust?

Throughout this week another video will be added each day.

We have prepared a series of videos to explain Personal Injury Trusts, through this series we will be answering the questions:

  1. What exactly is a Personal Injury Trust and why have one?
  2. Why are there so many names for Trusts?
  3. What sort of Trust should I use?
  4. What are Trustees and what do they do?
  5. What if I don't want a Trust?

Throughout this week another video will be added each day.

We have prepared a series of videos to explain Personal Injury Trusts, through this series we will be answering the questions:

  1. What exactly is a Personal Injury Trust and why have one?
  2. Why are there so many names for Trusts?
  3. What sort of Trust should I use?
  4. What are Trustees and what do they do?
  5. What if I don't want a Trust?

Throughout this week another video will be added each day.

For those who are unfamiliar with the Conditional Exemption Tax Incentive Scheme (the "Scheme"), it seeks to preserve and protect national heritage property and offers an exemption from inheritance tax and capital gains tax if the owner of such property complies with certain conditions, one of which will normally be to allow public access to the heritage property.

Understandably, we have received many queries from clients who own heritage property and who have concerns about their ability to fulfil public access conditions during this lockdown period.

HMRC has confirmed that there will be temporary changes to the Scheme in light of the current restrictions arising as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. HMRC's published guidance confirms that enforced closure due to Covid-19 will be taken into account when considering if undertakings have been met. As well as closure, the guidance also covers delay in opening property, objects on loan to other organisations that have closed, objects that can only be seen by appointment and advertising/promotional material.

As events are changing so rapidly, HMRC has warned that the current advice is subject to change. It is therefore imperative to ensure that the latest guidance is being followed.

If you are the owner of heritage property and you have any concerns in relation to meeting your undertakings to HMRC then please feel free to give us a call and we can provide advice on your specific position.

  • The short answer is yes! Although the lockdown and social distancing restrictions pose some difficulty, it is definitely possible to make an LPA.
  • At the moment, the Office of the Public Guardian still requires people who want to make an LPA and their attorneys to fill out a hard-copy form and physically sign it.  Once signed, the LPA then needs to be sent to the Office of the Public Guardian for registration.
  • Your signature will need to be witnessed whilst observing social distancing restrictions.  The witness needs to have a clear line of sight, but does not need to be physically close.  Some practical suggestions include signing your LPA outside with a neighbour acting as your witness, using your own pen and wearing gloves to handle paperwork.
  • You also need someone to act as your certificate provider, who will sign the LPA to confirm that you understand the LPA and are not under any pressure to make it.  There are rules about who can act as the certificate provider, but potentially the same neighbour who acts as the witness could also act as the certificate provider.  
  • There is a delay with registering LPAs at the moment, but the Office of the Public Guardian is aiming to complete the registration process within 40 working days of receiving the LPA (roughly 1-2 weeks longer than usual).
  • Although it is not as straightforward at the moment, we are continuing to guide clients through the process of putting an LPA in place, please contact us for more information.

05 Jun 2020

School's construction contract void for lack of capacity

We look at a recent case which has provided helpful clarity in relation to a school’s capacity to enter contracts.

05 Jun 2020

The role of trade unions in schools reopening following lockdown

The history of the trade union movement evidences the impact unions have had on protecting the health, safety and welfare of staff.

03 Jun 2020

Furlough scheme changes include 10 June cut-off date for staff who have not yet been furloughed

Government outlines changes to the Job Retention Scheme to take place between July and October 2020.